In a thinly veiled dig at members of the 6IX, Jahmiel of the MVP calls dibs on the latest lyrical war specifically with Chronic Law.

The audio single titled Dead Xample was released on April 13, 2020 by Gego Don Records with distribution handled by Hapilos. This lyrical confrontation follows in the line of perennial warfare between the MVP and the 6IX.

A melodious, likeable, lyrically well put together diss track that doesn’t necessarily call the name of any enemies – Jahmiel, a singer/deejay or ‘singjay’ delivers a single that is easy on the ears with a punchline that lends itself to a sing along.

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Jahmiel

The Where Were You singjay holds a professional flow while keeping the lyrics true to the topic of eradicating the egotistical opponent. He highlights the fact that the nemesis – presumed to be Chronic Law – may follow suit by dying with ‘gun pon dem belly’. Allegedly calling out the Law Boss for his previous work which states ‘gun pon belly the Beretta neva leff’, the Treasure singjay sends one of his killers to empty the ‘jelly’. Jahmiel goes further to diss the 6IX hierarchy by highlighting the fact that he doesn’t have a ‘don’ hence he has full autonomy for use of his many straps. This is a solid single by Jahmiel comprising hot lyrics and a catchy chorus.

Plaudits aside, if there could be one improvement to this single, it would be to aiming more clinical digs (calling names) to remove all ambiguity as to whom this track was intended.

Chronic Law responds

In true dancehall fashion, the ‘Law Boss’ Chronic Law responds to the Dead Xample diss track in less than twenty-four hours with his counteraction titled Pree. This beef couldn’t have been timelier for the Good Name deejay as his most recent tracks Covid-6IX Freestyle and Mad Killaz are gun tunes.

This single, released on April 14, 2020 by OneLaw Entertainment on the 1Law Riddim is another highly charged, lyrically effective ensemble, synonymous with the Chronic Law’s previous works.

It is of a similar flow to his other gun tunes and the delivery aligns seamlessly with the rhythm. He goes to work in a poetic tirade of grimy nature, pointing out that his general is in fact the 6IX boss. The deejay seems to put emphasis on lyrical delivery in this single rather than making it a catchy sing along. There are no phrases to specifically call out Jahmiel, hence the proposed war of tunes is stemming from the observations and inference from the fans of both camps.

Supporters on the MVP side of this latest lyrical tiff, may point out that these lyrics were borrowed from a previous presentation of the ‘Law Boss’, but that aside, this track was craftily re-engineered to be current, fitting, potent, and hitting the points raised by Jahmiel.

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Chronic Law. Courtesty Instagram/@1law_chroniclaw357

Dancehall thrives on lyrical confrontations, and this highly anticipated one, would definitely not disappoint. Two stars, with completely different styles, from opposing factions, with the same intention of being the champion. If this battle does move forward, the fans may be treated to a wonderful display of lyrical melodies provided by Jahmiel, and crazy lyrical flow presented by Chronic Law.

Well that is if each artiste goes true to form, but in battle, when the competition gets fierce, opponents usually rise to the occasion with a unique character that was never seen or experienced before. Our thoughts are that the intent is lacking on both sides, in the words of Chronic Law, after such addresses, ‘ Just tell mi nuh a whe unu a pre’?

Listen to Jahmiel’s Dead Xample below.

Listen to Chronic Law’s Pree below.

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